The 2016 Torrington Farmers Market!

torrington Wyoming Farmers Market

As the weather warms and you begin to think about fresh tomatoes and sweet corn, remember to check out the 2016 Torrington Farmers’ Market! The market is still on Thursdays but at a new time and a new location! Historically the Thursday market has been held at the Extension Office from 3 pm to 5 pm. The market has now been moved to City park, beginning at 5 pm.

“Historically the Thursday market has been held at the Extension Office from 3 pm to 5 pm. The market has now been moved to City park, beginning at 5 pm.”

There have been many who have asked for the market to be moved back downtown and to have a later start time so those who work would be able to attend the market. The hope of the new board of directors is that this new location and time will help to satisfy both needs, while also providing a wonderful location. The market will begin on Thursday, July 21st and will be held each Thursday until October 6th. Though the last date is weather dependent.

We are looking for additional vendors! If you are interested, please look over the following information or call Caleb Carter at (307) 532-2436.

Torrington Farmers Market vendor info and application (PDF)

You can also follow the Torrington Farmers Market on Facebook  facebook

Additional information for vendors

Guidelines to ensure public health at Farmers Markets (PDF)

Wyoming Business Council – Farmers Markets

Wyoming Farmers Market Association: The Wyoming Farmers Marketing Association works to promote the farmers markets in Wyoming. In Wyoming, finding fresh, locally grown produce is a luxury. Starting in mid-summer, many Wyoming agriculture producers can be found at the local farmers’ market offering the freshest and best produce money can buy.

Wyoming Department of Agriculture: The Wyoming Department of Agriculture is a valuable resource for food safety questions and weights and measures questions.

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Cattle Market Outlook and Market Negotiation Research Project

Goshen County Extension is hosting a Cattle Market Outlook and Market Negotiation Research Project on June 9, 2016. The meeting will be in the Brand Room, in the Rendezvous Center at the Goshen County Fair Grounds, from 6:30-8:00 p.m.

Wyoming Cattle Market Outlook– A look at the current conditions in the cattle business. The outlook will focus on supply, demand and trade and look at projected prices for this fall. Bridger Feuz – University of Wyoming Extension Livestock Marketing Specialist.

Market Negotiation Research Project– Dr. Chris Bastian , from the University of Wyoming Ag and Applied Economics Department, is leading an effort to better understand the needs of Wyoming producers in improving their negotiation skills for buying and selling agriculture products. Dr. Bastian will conduct a listening session to gain producer feedback which will help direct the outputs of the research project.

Continue reading Cattle Market Outlook and Market Negotiation Research Project

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Integrated pest management: not just for the farm!

As spring nears and your daydreams of fresh soil and growing plants come to fruition once again, you may find yourself haunted by pests set on thwarting your well laid plans. This could mean a new weed in your garden or flowerbed, something eating on your tomatoes or that pesky dandelion daring to show itself again.

Integrated Pest Management

They can come in all sizes, shapes and colors, and your management efforts should be as varied. This is often referred to as “Integrated Pest Management” (IPM). A strategy which has been in use on farms and ranches across the country for over a half century, but which also has place in your own lawn or garden as well. The idea behind IPM is to “integrate” multiple control methods together in an attempt to increase the effective management of a particular pest, in a safe, cost-efficient and environmentally sound manner.

Continue reading Integrated pest management: not just for the farm!

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Extension Administrative Assistant/Youth Show Coordinator

Do you enjoy working with people? Are you looking for a way to give back to the community and work with kids? We have reopened the search for an Extension Administrative Assistant/Youth Show Coordinator at the Goshen County Extension Office!

This unique professional position provides administrative support to
Extension Educators serving Goshen County while simultaneously providing leadership to the Goshen County Fair Youth Division under the supervision of the Goshen County Fair Youth Show Committee, a sub-committee of the Goshen County Fair Board. Continue reading Extension Administrative Assistant/Youth Show Coordinator

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Looking for hay, or current hay prices?

Do you have some hay for sale? Or are you looking for current hay prices? There are several resources you can utilize to buy or sell hay, or look to see what hay is selling for across Wyoming as well as regionally.

Opportunities for buying and selling hay

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This website is a joint venture between the University of Wyoming Extension and the Wyoming Business Council. The purpose of this website is to promote Wyoming’s high quality hay and seed. Continue reading Looking for hay, or current hay prices?

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Accessing winter wheat spring freeze injury

Accessing the damage caused by the snow and cold on May 9th and 10th can be difficult. There are many factors, beyond the temperature lows, that can determine the severity of wheat damage. This includes the growth stage, stand health, duration of the cold temps and soil moisture as well as micro-climates within the wheat field.

Areas with thin stands created by winter injury, for example, are more susceptible to freeze damage, as well as those that are not buffered by soil moisture in the topsoil. Differences in elevation, topography, etc. also make for micro-climates that can greatly affect the severity of the damage. Thus, low spots with thin stands and dry soil tend to be most susceptible.

Wyoming Wheat Condition

According to the Wyoming crop progress report for the week ending on May 10th, only about 11% of the state’s wheat had jointed. Continue reading Accessing winter wheat spring freeze injury

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Developing a fair lease rate: some tips and tools

One of the most popular posts on my blog has been the Pasture and Cropland leases and rates, posted on August 6, 2014. With spring just around the corner, and lots of questions coming in once again on this topic, as well as some new tools that I have found, I decided to update this post.

Why are you considering a lease?

This should be the first question that you ask yourself. Identify why you are looking to lease and let that guide you through the process.

  • To make money?
  • To help out a friend or neighbor?
  • Getting the new generation into farming/ranching?
  • How long do you want to lease for?
  • Consider how much involvement you want, especially as the landowner.
  • What is your acceptable level of risk?
  • What is the land/range quality?

Essential elements for any lease agreement:

There are some important components that must be a part of any lease agreement:

  • Beginning and ending dates
  • Legal names of all parties involved
  • Clear, legal description of the property involved

Outside of these details, there are several factors that should be considered and agreed upon by all parties involved and documented, in detail, in the written lease agreement. Continue reading Developing a fair lease rate: some tips and tools

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Management Transition Workshops

There has been a lot of talk lately about estate planning and getting all the necessary paperwork in order to make the transfer of the land, assets, etc. a simpler, smoother process; including your will, tax documents, power of attorney, etc. But have you thought about the transfer of the management skills necessary to continue the day-to-day operation of your farm or ranch?

Transferring the skills associated with management of any business can be difficult. This can be complicated though when it comes to the farm or ranch, which are often family owned. This could include hard skills such as how to determine what crop to rotate to next year, how much irrigation water to order, which heifers to keep and which to sell as well as finances and record keeping. Despite the challenges presented in passing these skills to the next generation, anyone involved in farming and ranching would agree that it is essential to continued sustainability of the operation. Continue reading Management Transition Workshops

2nd Annual Wyoming Bee College

Wyoming Bee College

The University of Wyoming Laramie County Extension is proud to host the second Wyoming Bee College Conference at Laramie County Community College, Cheyenne, WY, Conferences Building, Saturday, March 21 and Sunday, March 22.

The 2014 Bee College was very successful with 120 people attending from Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Dakota and Montana. The attendees included a mix of individuals who were just learning the craft as well as more advanced beekeepers who wanted to learn more in-depth care of pollinators. Continue reading 2nd Annual Wyoming Bee College

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Meetings explore small hydropower possibilities in Southeast Wyoming

Opportunities for agricultural producers, irrigation districts and other water users to develop small hydropower resources at existing water infrastructure will be covered in a roundtable and meeting in Torrington and Wheatland on February 17th.

The Wyoming Business Council, State Energy Office partnered with University of Wyoming Extension and the UW School of Energy Resources to develop the Wyoming Small Hydropower Handbook, which is the foundation of the discussion, said Milt Geiger, UW Extension energy coordinator. Continue reading Meetings explore small hydropower possibilities in Southeast Wyoming